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Williams Grand Prix Engineering Ltd is founded by Frank Williams and an ambitious British engineer called Patrick Head. The company is based in an empty carpet warehouse in Didcot, Oxfordshire, and enters a purchased March chassis in order to compete in F1 during the latter half of the season.
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1977
Bracket

The team fields a one-car team during its first season of competition. Alan Jones immediately forms a close working relationship with Williams and Head, and the car is competitive.
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1978
Trophy

In only its second season of competition, Williams finishes runner-up in the constructors’ championship. The team is beaten by Ferrari, who also win the drivers’ title with Jody Scheckter.
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1979
Trophy

The FW07B is the car to beat. Jones dominates the season en route to winning the world title and he’s ably supported by his new team-mate, Carlos Reutemann. The constructors’ crown falls to the team as well, leading Frank Williams to comment: "This is the best feeling in the world."
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1980
Trophy

Carlos Reutemann and Alan Jones win four races and bag the team its second consecutive constructors' championship. Reutemann loses out on the drivers' title by one point at the final race in Las Vegas, leading him to announce his retirement from the sport.
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1981

Consistency wins Rosberg the world title; he takes only one victory en route to sealing the championship by five points. The team’s other FW08 is shared by three drivers: Reutemann, Derek Daly and Mario Andretti.
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1982

Jacques Laffite partners the reigning champion, but there are few highlights for the Frenchman in the team's least successful season since 1978. Much of the year is spent gearing up for the imminent arrival of Honda’s turbo power in 1984.
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1983

The season is blighted by unreliability as Williams and Honda get to grips with turbo power for the first time. When the engine holds together, the car is quick and Rosberg takes a brilliant victory in the USA GP in Dallas.
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1984
Trophy

The FW10 is Williams' first carbon fibre chassis and the improved torsional stiffness of the car has an immediate impact on performance. Keke Rosberg starts the season-opening Brazilian GP on the front row and the FW10 is the car to beat from mid-season, once reliability is established.
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1985
Trophy

The year gets off to a devastating start, when Frank Williams is seriously injured in a road accident in the south of France. He crashes while driving to the airport after a pre-season test at Paul Ricard and his injuries leave him confined to a wheelchair. On-track, 1986 is a vintage year for Formula One. The dominance of the FW11 allows Williams to clinch its third constructors’ title with Nelson Piquet and Nigel Mansell, and the drivers finish second and third in the drivers’ standings.
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1986
Trophy

Nine months after his car accident, Frank Williams is back at the helm of Williams. He’s awarded a CBE in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list and, fittingly, 1987 is a dominant season for the team in which it wins the drivers’ and constructors’ titles.
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1987
Bracket

A transition year for Williams, while it waits for the arrival of Renault power in 1989. John Judd steps into the engine breach with his normally-aspirated V8, but it’s a disappointing year for the team. The highlights are Nigel Mansell two podiums, at Silverstone and Jerez.
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1988
Trophy

A successful opening season for the Williams-Renault partnership. Thierry Boutsen wins a couple of races (in Canada and Australia) and an impressive level of reliability and consistency propels the team to second place in the constructors’ championship.
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1989

There are many similarities to the ’89 season for Williams: the team wins a couple of races and shows a good level of consistency, but it struggles to match the pace of the McLarens and the Ferraris.
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1990
Trophy

This year marks the beginning of a very successful period for Williams-Renault. The FW14 is impressively quick from the outset, although it’s beset with reliability problems early in the year. Once the car finishes races, it’s a force to be reckoned with: Riccardo Patrese takes the team’s first win of the year in Mexico and there’s no looking back.
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1991
Trophy

The FW14B is still regarded as one of the most advanced racing cars ever built. It features a semi-automatic gearbox, active suspension, traction control and anti-lock brakes, and its rivals struggle to live with it.
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1992
Trophy

Alain Prost joins the team after a sabbatical from racing and Damon Hill is promoted from test driver to race driver in January. Prost hits the ground running, winning the opening race of the season in South Africa, and Hill quickly gets up to speed in the second car.
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1993
Trophy

The year is marred by tragedy when Ayrton Senna is killed at the third race of the season. He crashes at the Tamburello corner at Imola and succumbs to his injuries while in hospital. Since his death, all Williams cars have been branded with the Senna 'S' on or around the nose cone. From Monaco onwards, Damon Hill is thrust into the role of team leader and he runs Michael Schumacher close in the world title fight. He loses out to the German at the last race, following a controversial collision that takes both cars out of the race.
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1994
Trophy

A solid season for Williams, but one in which it can’t compete with Michael Schumacher’s Benetton. Damon Hill is the only driver to take the fight to the German, winning four races, but he’s still 33 points adrift come the end of the year.
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1995
Trophy

Williams is utterly dominant. The team wins all but four races during the year and it scores more than double the number of world championship points of its closest rival, Ferrari. The drivers’ title is an exclusive battle between Damon Hill and Jacques Villeneuve, Damon taking the crown at the final race in Japan.
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1996
Trophy

The team continues where it left off at the end of 1996. The FW19 is immediately quick in the hands of Jacques Villeneuve and Heinz-Harald Frentzen, winning three of the opening four races, and Jacques goes on to pip Michael Schumacher to the world championship.
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1997
Trophy

With Renault no longer officially involved in F1, Williams commits to a two-year supply of customer engines based on the French V10. The engines are rebadged Mecachrome for the '98 season. BMW announces it will return to F1 as the engine partner for Williams beginning in 2000. There’s a major overhaul of the technical regulations aimed at improving the spectacle.
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1998
Bracket

An all-new driver line-up for the team in the form of Ralf Schumacher and Alex Zanardi. There’s the same V10 as in ’98 (re-badged a Supertec), but this is a more difficult season for the team.
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1999
Trophy

Williams finishes a credible third in the constructors’ championship in its first year with BMW. Ralf Schumacher takes three podiums for the team and the FW22 demonstrates great consistency.
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2000
Trophy

Year two of the BMW partnership is a big step forward. The team scores more than double the number of world championship points of 2000 and it racks up four victories en route to third place in the constructors’ championship.
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2001
Trophy

A solid season for Williams. The team scores 12 more points than in 2001 and it finishes second in the constructors’ championship as a consequence. Unfortunately, there’s little it can do about champions Ferrari, who are in a league of their own in 2002.
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2002
Trophy

There are significant changes to the sporting regulations this year. For the first time in the history of F1, world championship points are awarded down to eighth place and one-lap qualifying is implemented. The drivers react well to the rule changes and the FW25 proves competitive from the outset.
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2003

The walrus-nosed FW26 causes a stir when it’s launched, but it takes a while to threaten its main rivals on-track. The team works tirelessly to improve performance and a late run of form is enough to ensure it beats longstanding rivals McLaren in the constructors' championship.
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2004
Bracket

It’s all change on the driving front, with Mark Webber and Nick Heidfeld steering the team's fortunes on-track. They notch up a handful of podiums, but there are no victories and the team drops to fifth place in the constructors’ championship.
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2005

Following the departure of BMW, the team joins forces once again with Cosworth for the new V8 era; it also has a new tyre supplier in Bridgestone. Nico Rosberg, son of 1982 world champion Keke, replaces Nick Heidfeld alongside Mark Webber.
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2006

Williams joins forces with Toyota in 2007, a change that immediately transforms its fortunes. The team scores three times as many world championship points as in '’'06 and it winds up fourth in the constructors' standings. It also has a 60 percent improvement in reliability over the previous season.
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2007
Bracket

The FW30 is quick from the outset. Nico Rosberg finishes third in the opening race of the year and the technical development of the car keeps up with the team’s main rivals because he also finishes on the podium in round 15, the Singapore Grand Prix.
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2008

Williams’ 2009 campaign is summed up by a lack of podiums. Nico Rosberg manages a couple of fourth places, but the FW31 – which has a double diffuser from the outset – lacks the punch of its rivals and the team comes home seventh in the constructors’ championship.
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2009

Rubens Barrichello, the most experienced driver in the history of the sport, joins the team alongside new GP2 Series champion Nico Hulkenberg. With Toyota gone, it’s all change on the engine front as well, with Williams returning to its old friends at Cosworth for V8 power.The season starts slowly for the team, but a performance upgrade at the European Grand Prix transforms the pace of the FW32. Barrichello finishes fourth at Valencia and he’s a regular points scorer for the remainder of the season.
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2010
Bracket

Cosworth remains on board for a second consecutive season, giving the team technical stability, but the year proves to be one of the most difficult in the team’s history and it finishes ninth in the constructors’ championship.
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2011

After the low of 2011, the FW34 is a much more competitive proposition thanks to the efforts of Williams’ new technical team. The car has a good balance and the driveability of Renault’s V8 immediately goes down well with drivers Pastor Maldonado and Bruno Senna. The true pace of the car is demonstrated by Maldonado at the Spanish Grand Prix, which he wins from pole position.
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2012

The team retains Pastor Maldonado for 2013 but he is joined by 2011 GP3 Champion and longstanding Williams Test driver Valtteri Bottas. The FW35 remains Renault powered meaning the team can build on the relationship formed in 2012. Changes within top management saw Executive Director Toto Wolff leave whilst Claire Williams, Frank Williams’ daughter, is appointed Deputy Team Principal and takes control of the day-to-day running of the team.
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2013
Trophy

The introduction of new hybrid 1.6 litre turbo charged V6 power units presented Williams with an ideal opportunity to improve its competitiveness compared to 2013. The decision to partner with Mercedes as the teams new power unit supplier proved pivotal, and the well powered FW36 showed strong early promise. A mixture of bad luck and difficulties in wet conditions meant that the team failed to maximise its points haul in the first half of the season. But this was to change in the second half as Williams out developed its rivals to emerge as the main challenger to front runners Mercedes. The team picked up its first podium since 2012 at the 2014 Austrian Grand Prix, and this was to lead to another eight podium finishes to eventually claim third in the Constructors Championship.
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2014
Trophy

Consistency was key in 2015 with only minor rule changes in effect; the same engine as 2014; and Felipe Massa and Valtteri Bottas pairing up again for a second season at Williams.
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2015